Month: May 2014

Reader Mailbag: Father’s Day

What’s inside? Here are five word summaries of the questions dealt with in today’s Reader Mailbag. Click on the number to hop down to the question. 1. Blogging as steady income? 2. Selling rental for debt repayment 3. Drowning in student loan debt 4. Fed up with overreaching charity 5. Should I join the Army? …

Categories: Reader Mailbag

Review: Who Can You Trust With Your Money?

Every Sunday, The Simple Dollar reviews a personal finance book or other book of interest. A while back, I wrote an article describing an utterly painful meeting my wife and I had with a financial advisor. That meeting was painful. It simply accelerated my souring on financial advisors, based on a long run of experiences …

Categories: What We're Reading

Why Your Summer Energy Bills Are So High

Yes, it’s almost always painful to receive that first energy bill of the summer months. That first month where the outdoor heat kicks into overdrive usually results in a friendly notice from the electric company with a number that sometimes has an extra digit that we didn’t expect or a “3″ in place of the …

Categories: Getting Started

Simple Changes Aren’t Always Simple

One of my favorite writers is Ian Rogers, who blogs about his health at Fistfulayen. In one of his best posts, he writes about his use of the L.L. Cool J workout, which eventually turns into an astute point that virtually every “healthy diet” book focuses on the same handful of seemingly simple principles. He …

Categories: Getting Started

The Simple Dollar Time Machine: June 19, 2010

Many newer readers of The Simple Dollar haven’t been exposed to the hundreds of great articles in the archives of the site, so this is a weekly series that highlights the five best posts from one year ago this week, two years ago this week, and three years ago this week. I call it … …

Categories: Time Machine

Summer Meal Series #3: Skillet Cilantro-Lime Chicken Fajitas and “Poor Man’s” Spanish Rice

This summer, I’m going to be posting a series of fifteen low-cost, tasty, and easy-to-prepare meals that are literally straight from my own kitchen. One of my favorite ways to start a great meal is to look at the grocery store flyers. This week, for example, I noticed that one of the grocery stores I …

Categories: Food, Frugality

Getting Things Done: Getting “In” to Empty

This is the sixth entry in a fourteen part series discussing the time management classic Getting Things Done by David Allen. New entries in this series will appear on Tuesday afternoons and Friday mornings through July 16. Last time, we focused on going through your mind, your home, and your workspace to collect together all …

Living “The Simple Dollar”

As many of you know, my new book, The Simple Dollar: How One Man Wiped Out His Debts and Achieved the Life of His Dreams is due to be released at the end of this month and should be available in bookstores all over the United States in early July. If you’d like, you can …

Categories: Meta

Reader Mailbag: Rain

What’s inside? Here are summaries of the included questions in five words or less. 1. Downgrading a car for e-fund 2. Handling an increase in income 3. Dealing with financially unsound parents 4. Starting out with a Roth IRA 5. Quicken or GnuCash? 6. Preparing for a second baby 7. Buy CD or pay debt? …

Categories: Reader Mailbag

Buying Things You Wish You Had Time For

Not too long ago, I traded in my Nintendo DS and the games I had accumulated for it for a Playstation 3 and a handful of used games. I did this for two reasons, mostly. One, I don’t play the DS much at all since I’m not traveling (when I am out and about, I …

Categories: Getting Started

The Simple Dollar Weekly Roundup: Money Is Time Edition

Everyone says that time is money. Well, there’s truth in the reverse, as well. If you spend your money wisely, money becomes time. You can spend your time doing things you care about if you’re not constantly chasing the dollar. The Rewards of Routine Maintenance This article meanders in a few different directions, but the …

Categories: Morning Roundup

Getting Things Done: Corraling Your Stuff

This is the fifth entry in a fourteen part series discussing the time management classic Getting Things Done by David Allen. New entries in this series will appear on Tuesday afternoons and Friday mornings through July 16. Last time, we discussed what exactly you need to have in place to get yourself organized (time, a …

Saying “I Will Do It In The Future” Is an Excuse for Failure

My office is a mess. I don’t feel like cleaning it – I’d rather play with the kids right now. So I say, “I will clean it in the future,” and I go play. A week later, my office is still a mess. You’re not saving for retirement. You’re also spending as much as you …

Categories: Getting Started

Think About Christmas … Now!

It’s mid-June, so there’s no better time to write about Christmas. Right? Right?! The truth of the matter is that just a little bit of forethought right now can save you a ton of time, effort, cost, and heartache this December. While it might feel really out of place to think about Christmas on a …

Categories: Getting Started

Reader Mailbag: Dad’s Health Update

What’s inside? Many readers have written to me asking for me to summarize the questions in the mailbag right at the top so that they know what’s inside. So, I’m going to try this out for this mailbag and see how it goes. Here are summaries of the included questions in five words or less. …

Categories: Reader Mailbag

Review: The New Frugality

Every Sunday, The Simple Dollar reviews a personal finance book or other book of interest. The title of this book hooked me from the start. What am I writing about at The Simple Dollar if I’m not writing about “the new frugality”? Chris Farrell, the author of the book, is a name I’m familiar with …

Cutting Yourself Some Slack

Karen writes in: Over the last six months, my husband and I have paid off $11,000 in credit card debt. It feels great. But it’s also really, really hard. In order to do that, we’ve stopped going out and doing a lot of the things we used to do. I feel like I’m missing something …

Categories: Getting Started

What Does an Extended Lifespan Really Mean in Terms of Retirement Savings?

Here’s a number for you. Half of all babies born in the United States this year will live to age 104 or older. In other words, when a person from that generation hits the typical “retirement age” of 65, they’ll still have 40 years of life left. Obviously, this represents a major change from where …

Categories: Retirement

The Simple Dollar Time Machine: June 12, 2010

Many newer readers of The Simple Dollar haven’t been exposed to the hundreds of great articles in the archives of the site, so this is a weekly series that highlights the five best posts from one year ago this week, two years ago this week, and three years ago this week. I call it … …

Categories: Time Machine