By Request: Five More Essential Crock Pot Recipes

A long time ago, after posting several articles about using a crock pot to save money and still produce great, quick meals, readers asked me to post ten of my favorite crock pot recipes. Since digging through my recipes and typing them out again in an comprehensible format takes a while, I started by posting five of them.

And I never got around to posting the other five. Today, I’m completing that post.

So, after you’ve perused the art of the slow cooker and five of my favorite recipes, here are five more for you to try. I have no idea where these originally came from, but each was experimented on and modified more than a few times and seem to only exist on my own handwritten cards.

One big tip! If you’re going to leave these on for more than eight hours, add an extra half a cup of water before you go. The biggest danger for cooking things in a crock pot longer than that is having the food dry out.

Let’s go!

Chicken Chili (our current favorite crock pot recipe)

1 1/4 lbs boneless skinless chicken breasts
2 15 oz. cans great northern beans or navy beans (I prefer to soak dry beans myself)
12 oz. frozen sweet corn kernels
1 4 1/2 oz. can chopped green chiles (or you can chop your own)
3 tbsp. chili powder
16 oz. chicken stock or chicken broth
8 oz. half and half (you can use skim milk if you want it healthier)
1/2 tsp. corn starch (if you want it thicker)
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 cup chopped onion (optional)

Dice the chicken into 1″ cubes and put them in a slow cooker. Add the beans and corn and optional onions. In a bowl, mix the chili powder, the peppers, the half and half, and the chicken broth or stock (and the starch, if you want it thicker). Stir until well-mixed, then add to the chicken. Cover and cook for 8-10 hours on low. Just before serving, stir in sour cream until consistent.

Wild Rice Turkey

1 1/2 cups wild rice
2 cups finely chopped onion
1/4 cup golden raisins
2 apples, chopped
3 cups chicken broth or chicken stock
1 1/4 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. marjoram
3/4 tsp. sage
1/2 tsp. pepper
whole turkey brest (4 lbs. or so)

Mix rice, onion, raisins, apples, thyme, salt, pepper, sage, and marjoram until consistent. Put thsi mixture on the bottom of the pot. Cover with chicken broth/stock and make sure all of the rice is covered with at least a quarter of an inch of liquid – if not, supplement with some water or additional stock. Place whole turkey breast (thawed, of course) on top. Cook on low for eight hours and be sure to check the temperature of the turkey before you remove it (it should be 160 degrees F or roughly 75 C).

Stuffed Zucchini

1 medium zucchini or squash, halved lengthwise, with seeds removed
1 cup tomato sauce
1 tbsp. red wine vinegar
1 onion, chopped
1 tsp. minced or powdered garlic
1/4 cup brown rice (uncooked)
1 tbsp. parsley
1 tbsp. basil
1/8 tsp. black pepper
Mozzarella cheese (optional)

Put the zucchini halves in the bottom of the crockpot. Mix the tomato sauce and vinegar together in a small bowl – a cereal bowl works. In another bowl, combine the onions, garlic, rice, parsley, basil, and pepper and mix thoroughly. Add two tablespoons of the tomato-red wine mix to the onion mix and stir thoroughly. Put the onion mix on the zucchini halves, then pour the rest of the tomato-red wine mix on top. Cook on low for 6 hours.

Three Bean Stew

1 cup dried lima beans
1 cup dried great Northern beans
1 cup dried chickpeas / Garbanzo beans
4 cups water
16 oz. carrots (baby or sliced full carrots)
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
2 1/2 cups or 1 14 oz. can diced tomatoes
2 tbsp. tomato paste
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 tbsp. parsley
1 tsp. basil
1/2 tsp. thyme
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper
1 bay leaf

Soak the beans together overnight in water by putting the beans in a pan, then adding water until there’s an inch of water on top of the beans. Drain the beans and place in crock pot. Add the water, carrots, oinion, garlic, parsley, basil, thyme, pepper, and the bay leaf to the crock pot. Cook on low for eight to ten hours. Add the tomatoes, the paste, and salt and cook for another hour on low. Remove bay leaf and serve.

Barbecued Ribs (it doesn’t beat slow-cooked on a grill, but it’s very good!)

4 lbs. baby back ribs, lightly peppered and salted
2 cups catsup
1 cup finely diced tomatoes
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/8 tsp. cloves
1/4 cup vinegar
2 tbsp. pepper
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
2 tsp. oregano
2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
hot sauce to taste

Rub the ribs down with salt and pepper. Put them in a shallow baking pan and bake them in the oven for 15 minutes at 400 F / 200 C. Turn the ribs over and brown for another 15 minutes in the oven. While it’s browning, mix the other ingredients in a bowl. Take the ribs from the oven, place in a slow cooker, pour the sauce over the ribs, and flip the ribs around to coat them. Cover and cook on low for eight hours. Delicious!

Good luck!

If you enjoyed reading this, sign up for free updates!

Loading Disqus Comments ...
Loading Facebook Comments ...
  1. Kat says:

    The chicken chili sounds yummy but I have heard that dairy curdles in crock pots. Anyone ever have that happen? I am afraid of ruining the entire meal because I added milk…how do you avoid it?

  2. Chelsea says:

    The only thing I would say is not to put the raisins in the wild rice turkey until it’s almost done. Otherwise you’ll end up with grapes. They’ll taste fine but look kinda weird (ask me how I know…).

  3. Des says:

    Wow! I am thoroughly impressed that not one, but two of these recipes are vegan! The crockpot recipes of frugal sites nearly always have meat, and the crockpot recipes on vegan websites aren’t always designed to be frugal. Seeing the two worlds intersect is like a tasty lightning strike :)

  4. Johanna says:

    What Des said. Although the non-vegans might be wondering what they’re supposed to do with the optional mozzarella in the zucchini recipe.

    How big is a “medium zucchini” for you? The ones they sell at the farmers’ markets here come in a huge range of sizes.

  5. Courtney says:

    Another awesome thing to make in the crock pot is homemade yogurt! I adapted this from Crockpot365’s recipe (I like my yogurt really thick).

    Pour a half-gallon of 2% milk into crock pot. Whisk in 1 1/2 cups of powdered non-fat milk (helps with thickening). Place an 8-ounce cup of plain greek yogurt (I use Chobani) on the counter to come to room temperature. Cover the crock pot and heat on high setting for 3 hours. Turn off and let sit for two hours. Put room temperature yogurt in a bowl and whisk in about 1-2 cups of the warm milk. Add this back into the crock pot and whisk to combine. Put the lid back on, cover with a thick blanket or towel and let sit for 12-14 hours. Chill. Add honey, fruit, vanilla, etc to taste.

    The first time I made this, I felt like a wizard. You can also scoop out a cup and save it in the fridge for a second batch.

  6. Stephan F- says:

    Kat, I use half&half all the time in my crockpot overnight oatmeal, its on low all the time so that may be why.
    1 cup steel cut oats
    1 cup dried cranberries
    1 cup dried blueberries
    4 cups water
    1/2 cup half&half
    In a crock-pot, combine all ingredients and set to low heat. Cover and let cook for 8 to 9 hours.
    Stir and remove to serving bowls. Start before bed for a good hot breakfast. Cinnamon makes a great topping and so does more half&half.

  7. Anna is now Raven says:

    Johanna, I think for present purposes a medium zucchini is one that will fit on the bottom of your crockpot without having to be bent out of shape.

  8. David says:

    I tried a similar chicken chilli recipe and soaked the beans myself. They turned out hard and crunchy with a ‘skin’ on them… Whats the trick?

  9. lurker carl says:

    David, precook the beans. Evidently your crock pot doesn’t get hot enough for long enough to cook them.

  10. deRuiter says:

    Good recipes. Any of these using onion would be even better if you caramelized the chopped / sliced onions before you start. That means put them in a heavy pan (cast iron skillet is best) with some olive oil and stir over medium heat until they turn golden brown and smell great. It is an extra step, but the taste of the finished product is richer and even better.

  11. Diana says:

    Using a crockpot can really trim money on the budget as most slow-cooked dishes freeze well, too. It’s one of many tools that can be utilized to save money while providing delectible home made meals for your family.

    Recently, as part of my money saving efforts, I’ve returned to cooking the way I did when I had kids at home. I buy ingredients that can be used in a variety of recipes and add others that are specific to those I have in mind to do. Since I live more than 20 miles from the nearest grocery store, I do my main shopping once a month, and just get perishables as needed inbetween.

    For as many days as it takes to make up the recipes in bulk, I begin cooking after returning from the big shopping trip. This not only includes entrees, but side dishes and desserts, as well. I freeze them in meal-size portions for the month. This leaves the rest of the month free of daily cooking chores. I just need to make a salad to go with whatever I feel like eating that evening. It also means I always have a variety of foods if guests pop in.

    This not only saves me time, but ensures I have healthy food around all the time. There is no waste at all since nothing has a chance to go bad before it’s prepared. I think of my freezer as another type of savings account because the more I put in, the more I save in time and money.

    Just because I live alone now was not an excuse to stop using this method. Too many empty nesters spend their resources eating out or not eating well. Tit; you might like it.

  12. Diana says:

    Using a crockpot can really trim money on the budget as most slow-cooked dishes freeze well, too. It’s one of many tools that can be utilized to save money while providing delectible home made meals for your family.

    Recently, as part of my money saving efforts, I’ve returned to cooking the way I did when I had kids at home. I buy ingredients that can be used in a variety of recipes and add others that are specific to those I have in mind to do. Since I live more than 20 miles from the nearest grocery store, I do my main shopping once a month, and just get perishables as needed inbetween.

    For as many days as it takes to make up the recipes in bulk, I begin cooking after returning from the big shopping trip. This not only includes entrees, but side dishes and desserts, as well. I freeze them in meal-size portions for the month. This leaves the rest of the month free of daily cooking chores. I just need to make a salad to go with whatever I feel like eating that evening. It also means I always have a variety of foods if guests pop in.

    This not only saves me time, but ensures I have healthy food around all the time. There is no waste at all since nothing has a chance to go bad before it’s prepared. I think of my freezer as another type of savings account because the more I put in, the more I save in time and money.

    Just because I live alone now was not an excuse to stop using this method. Too many empty nesters spend their resources eating out or not eating well. Try it; you might like it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>