frying eggs in a pan

Recently, I came across this infographic that listed a bunch of different foods, separated by category (fruit; vegetables; fats, nuts, and seeds; fish, poultry, and eggs; whole grains; beans and tofu; red meat; and dairy) and sorted within those categories by the cost per cup or cost per 100 calories, depending on the item. (The truly low-calorie items, which were the vegetables and fruits, were listed by cost per cup, while the other more calorie-dense items were listed by cost …

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The fact that we can fly to the other side of the world never ceases to amaze me. After enduring an initial trip to the airport, you can check your bags, board your aircraft, and be on your way. And if you’re lucky, you might even sleep through the entire flight – falling asleep in one land and waking up in another world. While this all sounds great, there’s more to flying than pure joy and adventure. For all its conveniences, …

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If you’re wondering what on Earth “hedonic adaptation” is, keep reading. It’s a fancy term for something that’s actually pretty straightforward. The other day, I happened to find myself at a Whole Foods. Now, I don’t have anything whatsoever against Whole Foods. I think they sell a ton of good products there. Having said that, most of the products at Whole Foods are rather expensive variations on things you can get at discount grocers or fall into the category of …

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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has ordered two of the nation’s three largest credit reporting agencies, Equifax and TransUnion, to pay more than $23 million in fines and restitution for the alleged deceptive marketing of their credit monitoring subscription products. The remaining credit reporting agency, Experian, has not been fined as part of the CFPB’s action. In a statement released by the CFPB earlier this month, director Richard Cordray stated, “TransUnion and Equifax deceived consumers about the usefulness of the …

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What’s inside? Here are the questions answered in today’s reader mailbag, boiled down to summaries of five or fewer words. Click on the number to jump straight down to the question. 1. Where should retirement savings go? 2. Buying furniture on credit 3. Buying a house to flip 4. Bonus issue 5. You Need a Budget recommendation? 6. Scentsy and other marketing schemes 7. Intermittent fasting? 8. Leveraging outside interest for raise 9. Overvaluing the now 10. Earning money in …

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When just about anyone can call themselves a financial planner, it’s understandably hard for consumers to know whom to trust for financial advice. See, unlike doctors and lawyers who have to meet certain standards in order to hold themselves out as certified professionals, there are virtually no requirements you have to meet in order to use the title “financial planner” or “financial advisor.” As a result, there are many different kinds of people who call themselves financial planners, many of …

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Some of the most important lessons I’ve learned about money have come from personal finance books. While reading Your Money or Your Life, for example, I realized the money I earned was representative of my life force – and that each time I wasted money, I was wasting my own efforts. Other books like The Millionaire Next Door reminded me of something I already knew – that people with modest incomes can truly become rich if they avoid consumerism and …

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I faced what I consider to be “career burnout” at three points in my life. In 2004, I was getting burned out on uncertainty. My job for the few years prior to that was based on a series of short-term contracts and I was just getting fed up with not having any sort of stability. Sarah and I had been talking seriously about children and it just didn’t feel like stability was coming. In 2007, I was getting burned out …

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Over the years, I’ve written about literally thousands of tactics for spending less money, earning more money, and putting that extra money to work to eliminate debt, build an emergency fund, save for retirement, or succeed at other goals. At a glance, most of those tactics seem really, well, simple. It’s not really rocket science to realize that making coffee at home is going to cost less than buying it at Starbucks, or that grocery shopping with a grocery list …

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“31 Days to Financial Independence” is an ongoing series that appears every Thursday on The Simple Dollar. You might want to start this series from the beginning! Last time, we put a capstone on our discussions of how to spend less money and how to earn more money by looking at how they come together to form a “gap” between your income and your spending. That “gap” is a very powerful tool. You can use that gap to pay off …

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