Ten Pieces of Inspiration #36

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Each week, I highlight ten things each week that inspired me to greater financial, personal, and professional success. Hopefully, they will inspire you as well.

1. Dave Ramsey on work and money
Dave clues in on one of the key components of making money.

“We learned early on that if we help enough people, the money will come.” – Dave Ramsey

Do you have a skill or a product that can make people’s lives better? That’s probably your key to making money.

2. Dan Ariely discusses learning and conflicts of interest
I see this all the time, particularly when it comes to politics.

If you’ve already made up your mind before you sit down, you’re not going to learn anything. If you’re going to sit down to learn something, don’t waste your time by coming at it with preconceptions.

3. Charles Schwab on working for money’s sake
Ever notice how the people who seem to get ahead in life are the ones who are passionate about what they’re doing?

“The man who does not work for the love of work but only for money is not likely to make money nor find much fun in life.” – Charles Schwab

There’s a big connection there. People will always pay for the combination of passion and skill.

4. Artfire
Artfire is a site somewhat like the previously-mentioned Etsy. Both focus on handmade goods and provide a platform for people to make items at home and sell them to a large audience.

I often look at these sites for gift ideas (things I’ll make myself to give as gifts) and sometimes as a place to purchase a gift. It’s also a powerful way for people with an artistic or crafty bent to make money on the side.

5. Linus and Lucy
This is the song I’m trying to learn on the piano right now.

I’m going to guess it’s going to sound familiar to an awful lot of you.

6. Henry Ward Beecher on the measure of a person
I would far rather hang out with a great person without much money than an awful person with a lot of money.

“He is rich or poor according to what he is, not according to what he has.” – Henry Ward Beecher

You can decide for yourself who is worth paying attention to.

7. Van Gogh’s The Bedroom (1889), at the Art Institute of Chicago
I was there less than a week ago. This was one of the two highlights for me.

Van Gogh's The Bedroom

Something about this painting just lit up the room for me.

Thanks to Dawn Zarimba for the wonderful photo of this painting hanging in the gallery.

8. FDR on money and effort
I’m happiest not when I’m making money, but when I’m creating something.

“Happiness is not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

Money is a nice reward that comes later. It’s the act of doing something that’s exhilirating.

9. Camille Pissarro
I had never appreciated Pissarro’s art until my visit to the Art Institute of Chicago last weekend.

Many paintings by him spoke to me, but the one that really stood out to me was this one, Woman Bathing Her Feet in a Brook (1894/95).

Camille Pissarro

This was easily my daughter’s favorite painting at the entire museum (and one of mine, too!).

Thanks to one2c900d for the picture!

(I also really liked The Place du Havre, Paris (1893) by him, as well, but I couldn’t find a good public domain picture of it.)

10. Emerson on the reality of money
People often seem nostalgic for the great times of the past. In truth, though, the past wasn’t really all that better than today. As humans, we tend to remember the good times and forget the bad ones, so the past often looks pretty good.

“Can anybody remember when the times were not hard and money not scarce?” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

One can never really roll back the clock to some earlier great times. Instead, we have to move forward from where we’re at.

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6 thoughts on “Ten Pieces of Inspiration #36

  1. #6 – I’d rather hang out with a great person than an awful person, too, but $ doesn’t play into the equation.

  2. I try to surround myself with successful people who are smarted than me. I will learn just by observing and interacting with them. BTW, I think some of my success may be attributed to interacting with those smarter, more successful people. Some of what you brought up from the past is the reason, we study the classics or history. Not to dwell on it, but to learn from it.

  3. Please tell Dawn that photographing works of art can damage them. That is why museums generally ask you not to.

  4. I don’t get the Van Gogh, it looks like a child painted it. I can’t see the art.

    The Camille Pissarro painting, I clearly see the art and think it is beautiful. I just don’t get what is wrong with me that I can’t see the two as equals.

  5. #4 Bill: It’s in the eye of the beholder. I get much more out of Van Gogh than Pissaro. A child? Perhaps I see things you do not, albeit childish.

  6. I hope you saw Hopper’s “Nighthawks” at the Art Institute of Chicago. To see it is on my bucket list.

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