The Simple Dollar Weekly Roundup: Bookshelf Edition

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As I’ve mentioned before, I don’t have much of a desire to collect books. I keep a small pile of reference books around for information and inspiration, and I have a handful of books I’m sure I’ll re-read in the future. Other than that, the only books I retain are unread books.

I have a bookshelf in my office and, aside from part of the top shelf, the only books on it are unread books – ones I’ve never read. I pick them up at yard sales, from PaperBackSwap, and so forth and just pop them on there.

Whenever I read a book, I usually put it in another box that I intend to give away in the near future. About every six months or so, I give away the contents of the box, usually on PaperBackSwap.

Why am I mentioning this? A few days ago, I spent a couple of hours reorganizing this bookshelf. Rather than feeling like I was just shuffling around stuff that I wouldn’t look at again, I was excited. It made me want to shout, “Clear my schedule! I’ve got some books to read!”

Those are the kinds of possessions I want in my life. That’s not clutter, that’s joy.

Remove a Limiting Belief in About 20 Minutes Beliefs are things that should be challenged. It either reinforces and strengthens a belief or it replaces that belief with something closer to the core of who you are. Either way, that’s a win. (@ steve pavlina)

How to Be Indispensable The best way to be indispensable is to create things useful to others and pack the ideas with intelligence, loyalty, kindness, respect, discipline, pride, passion, and compassion. (@ jonathan fields)

Pay Yourself First In other words, the first thing that should come out of your paycheck is some sort of savings for the future. This is a very powerful approach, as it ensures your long term future while also teaching you to live on less. (@ get rich slowly)

Overcompensating to Change Habits “When I was studying piano, I used to practice playing scales with each hand playing in a different key. This wasn’t something I was ever likely to do in real music, but it helped push the fingerings into my subconscious.” Brilliant. There’s no better way to reinforce a habit than to focus on mastering those little specifics. (@ productivity501)

How to Speed Read Like Theodore Roosevelt These are the techniques I use when I first read a document. Quite often, I’ll follow it up with more careful, slow reading when I’m trying to understand a specific point or topic. (@ art of manliness)

How to Defeat Burnout and Stay Motivated The best way I’ve found to defeat burnout is to use a lot of milestones. I find that big goals make it hard for me to stay on task – instead, I set goals for the next few days that are in line with the big goal. (@ zen habits)

Another Case from the Clueless Files I really don’t like the type of reporting highlighted in this article. Attempting to make me sympathetic for people who made stupid mistakes, realized they were stupid, then made them again is something of a turn-off. (@ free money finance)

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4 thoughts on “The Simple Dollar Weekly Roundup: Bookshelf Edition

  1. Me, too. I have a few bookshelves in my office that are devoted to books. I know that sounds like a lot, but I’ve weeded these books several times and I’m left with what I find indispensable. But I get so excited everytime I go to the shelves – I think “I’ve got to read this again!” About twice a year I weed these books, but most of them stay.

    That being said I read about 2 books a week – mostly non-fiction. Most come from the library, but a few are bought new and used. I read them, then decide if I want to keep (usually the answer is no) and I either resell them or donate them to the library.

  2. Man, I don’t see how you could ever let go of books!

    I have tons of shelves, covered in books. Most of them are gifts, books I’ve had since I was a child, or things I find in a used book-store and Paperback Swap.

    Do you really not enjoy re-reading some of them? I have some books I could recite nearly word for word, but they still make me tremendously happy. Sure, maybe getting rid of books you don’t plan to read again is a good idea, but do you really not have any you keep around?

  3. I like some links but… Steve Pavlina? Do you know he proclaims to win at blackjack by conversing with the deads?

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